Broadleaf Lupine or Artic Lupine

lupinus latifolius

lupine
All photos with blue borders expand if clicked
lupine
flowers to end
lupine
seed pods at bottom
lupine
Robust on logged over cutbank
lupine
Often intermixed with Foxglove
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lupine
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Developing seed pods

There is a high possibility that this flower is misclassified. Peck idenifies 47 species and a few varieties of lupines. Featured here is a small one usually isn't over knee high found along roadsides and open areas in Northwest Oregon.

If I'm correct, the range of this variety of lupine is vast, running from southern British Columbia through northern California and on both sides of the Cascades in Oregon and Washington.

The lower photos show the seed pods while still green. They ripen and dry to a black color, and open with a snap that sends the seeds flying. When mature just walking past a plant and bumping it will set them off, and the noise is enough to be startling.

The lupine that is featured here has a lot of white in the flowers, and purples, compared to some I've seen elsewhere that is consistent deep blue. It's a member of the pea family and flowers in a sequence from the bottom up over a period of time so you can find developed seed pods down the stem as the end has fresh flowers. Lupine thrives in freshly disturbed areas which are not heavily grassed, such as recently logged areas.

Additional information: see Wikpedia - Lupine

- - Updated 09/05/2016
- - Updated 12/20/2012
- - Updated 06/25/2011
- - Updated 06/22/2008