House Finch

Carpodacus mexicanus

House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch
House Finch

The female House Finch (pictured here) is a nondescript looking light-brown bird. The male is darker with a yellow to orange head and chest. Both have a beautiful song, a warble ending in a metallic sound. Also pictured are male and female juveniles with some down on them.

You can frequently see House Finches hanging around your yard eating seeds. They also feed on berries, blossoms and buds; and they love sunflower seeds.

They make a cup-like nest of twigs and grasses, placed in a shrub, a vine, a hanging planter, or a birdhouse. The female builds the nest and lays from two to six bluish white eggs with speckles; These are incubated by the female for 11-19 days. Both parents feed the young. They fledge in 15-19 days.

They can be fond in urban areas, suburbs, parks, canyons, ranches, and semi-dry brush country. They are originally from the western United States, including Oregon, but they are expanding into the east part of the country, having been introduced to Long Island as a cage bird called a 'Linnet' in the 1940s.

By Martha Van Natta

Additional information: see Wikpedia - House Finch

- - Updated 11/15/2015
- - Updated 8/1/2014