American Robin

Turdus Migraterius

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Photo by Martha VanNatta
robin
Photo by Martha VanNatta

The American Robin is one of the most common birds in North America. It is pretty much seen year round in most of the United States, during the summer in Canada, and during the winter in Mexico and Central America. Huge flocks of robin migrate; but for some unknown reason, some of the birds stay behind.

You can frequently see robins feasting on insects and earthworms in your lawn. In winter they are commonly seen in fruit and berry trees, such as holly. Robins can be found in forests, woodlands, gardens and parks.

Pairs of robins build a cup-like nest of grass and mud in shrubs, orchard trees, or on buildings. The female lays 4-7 pale blue eggs without markings. The female incubates the eggs for 12-14 days. Both parents feed the young for 14-16 days. Robins raise 2-3 broods per year.

Robins have a beautiful cheerily cheerio cheerup song which is repeated in the early morning. Other calls are a flat tut and a sharp cheep. The flight call is a piercing zeeeert.

A male robin is shown here in cold weather with breast feathers fluffed up. The female robin is a paler color and usually has a lighter-colored head, although it can be as dark as the male. The juvenile robin has a spotted breast. An interesting fact: the farther west you go in North America, the lighter colored the robin.

by Martha Van Natta

Additional information: see Wikpedia - American_robin

- - Updated 11/15/2015
- - Updated 4/29/2014 - - Updated 2/07/2014