Camp Robber or Gray Jay

Perisoreus canadensis obscurus

Camp Robber
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Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
Camp Robber
camp Robber
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camp Robber
camp Robber
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This is a beautiful bird (a member of the crow family), commonly referred to as 'camp robber,' particularly around campsites and logging operations, as it is quite bold in stealing food and pretty trinkets. Its diet consists of just about anything: corn, suet, sunflower seeds, fruit, nuts, mice, and insects. The gray jays in our backyard came immediately when I crumbled up some old corn bread and put it out. They are frequent visitors to bird feeders. They are not afraid of humans and can be tamed to come to your hand for nuts and raisins. They will take food, make a little wad with their saliva, and attach it to a tree, then cover that with moss or other greenery, hiding it for the future.

The gray jay is non-migrating except that it does change elevation with the season. They can be found mostly near coniferous woods. They are found mostly in Canada and in the northwestern United States, including the Rocky Mountains, but not the desert.

Gray jays raise one brood a year, laying 3-4 grayish white eggs, with fine or no marks on them. The female will incubate the eggs for 16-18 days. The young stay in the nest for 15-21 days, and are fed by both the parents. The juvenile is a sooty gray with a whitish mustache.

by Martha Van Natta

Additional information: see Wikpedia - Gray_jay

- - Updated 11/15/2015
- - Updated 2/24/2014