Bald Eagle

Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

bald eagle
All photos with blue borders expand if clicked
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bald eagle
typical Juvenile
bald eagle
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bald eagle

The Bald Eagle is well known in North America, and needs no introduction.

Remarkable in appearance with its stark white head and tailfeathers on a dark, brown body, the national bird of the United States can be seen in most of the states and in Canada and parts of Mexico. Bald eagles are very common in Alaska and Florida. This is a truly awesome bird that can be seen in treetops along shores, lakes, rivers or just about anywhere where the fishing is good. Eagles also eat carrion, small animals, and other birds. If you are truly lucky, you will see an eagle diving from a treetop to catch a fish in a stream or river. Eagles are known to follow fish runs such as salmon. Watch for them in tall trees, especially in snags. Juvenile eagles up to about four or five years of age have brown bodies with white speckles on them, looking similar to a golden eagle. Eagles grow to be 31-37 inches with up to a 7-foot wingspan. The female and male bald eagles are identical except that the female is a little larger. An eagle is a beautiful bird to see in flight.

Bald eagles nest on a huge platform. They nest in tall trees, and there are always branches overhead for protection. The male and female build the nest, and they raise one brood a year. The pair return to the same nest every year and add more sticks. The nest can weigh 1,000 pounds (450 kg). An eagle nest is pictured here. In early spring the female eagle will lay two eggs, off-white without any markings. Both parents will take turns incubating the eggs for 34-36 days. Also, both will feed the young who fledge for 75-90 days.

Bald eagles have a harsh voice, making a piercing scream or a short call 'k k k kip kip kip.'

Eagles favorite roost is a high tree where they can use their keen eyesight to watch for lunch.

Additional information: see Wikpedia - Bald_eagle

- - Updated 11/15/2015
--updated 2/9/14 - - Updated 9/14/2013