White-crowned sparrow

Zonotrichia leucophrys

White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
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White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow

You can see White-Crowned Sparrows flitting gaily around from bush to bird feeders to trees to the ground. I always think of them as wearing bicycle helmets - a bit of imagination on my part, I guess. These birds are in pairs, sometimes in small family groups, and in flocks when they migrate. They will eat seeds, berries, insects off the ground and some plant material. They will feed on the ground by scratching backwards with both feet at the same time. The White-Crowned Sparrow makes a cup-shaped nest of grass, twigs and plant stems, placing it on the ground or in a shrub. They lay three to five pale blue or green eggs with darker spots. Two broods are raised per year. The female incubates the eggs for 11-14. The birds fledge in 8-12 days. Both parents feed the young. The female and the male White-Crowned Sparrow look identical. The juveniles have brown stripes on their head instead of black. The male will take care of the first brood while the female is working on the second brood. You can see White-Crowned Sparrows year round; however, the ones you see in the spring are not the ones you’ll see in the winter as they all migrate south. The ones you see in the winter are ones that have migrated from the north. The White Crowned-Sparrow may be seen in Western North America including the Pacific Northwest, California, the Pacific Coast, and the Central U.S. to the Caribbean and Mexico. They are a song bird and sing a pretty melody. The birds are present in Northern Oregon in the spring (March/April) . By Robert and Martha Van Natta

Additional information: see Wikpedia - White-crowned sparrow

- - Updated 04/07/2017
- - Updated 11/15/2015
- - Updated 12/16/2012
- - Updated 5/3/2012